Recent Releases

Category: Recent Releases

The Lost Scroll of the Physician Blog

The Lost Scroll of the Physician centers around a mysterious scroll which happens to be a real-life document. The Edwin Smith Medical Papyrus is the oldest manual of medical surgery that we have ever found and is dated to the Second Intermediate Period, an era in history that we’ve only just begun to learn more about. I’ve always been fascinated by civilizations’ lost pockets of time and once I started learning more about this enigmatic blip in Ancient Egypt’s expansive past, the more drawn in I became.

The Jigsaw Puzzle King Blog

I’ve been a Montessori teacher (of 9 - 12 year olds) for about twenty-five years. For those who know nothing of the Montessori approach — well, I’m sorry, I won’t explain it here, except to say that we like to introduce new ideas with what we call a great story. The Great Story of Language or the Great Story of Math are stories that help inspire children to wonder and to appreciate humanity’s greatest accomplishments. 

River of Lies Blog Post

TAKE 3: THE LIE

So I was invited by Dundurn Press to write a guest post. That was over a month ago, plenty of time, no problem. I started to write about the latest in my BC Blues crime fiction series, River of Lies. At that time COVID-19 was in the news, but seemed distant. Life went on as normal, here in Nelson. Though we learned to sing happy birthday when washing our hands.

I started writing my post, but the news kept distracting me. Things were getting scarier. The numbers were surging. I scrapped Blog Post Take 1.

Dundurn Press is excited to congratulate historian and author Debra Komar whose 2019 book The Court of Better Fiction is shortlisted for the 2020 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Nonfiction Crime Book!

None of it would have happened if I hadn’t taken a risk.

I’d long wanted to write a book about the haunted hospital near my house, but I didn’t know where to start or how to balance things or… well, anything. I just felt like it had a story I wanted to tell, something about the history and the rumours about ghosts and hauntings.

“Where did you get the idea for your book?” It’s a question authors are asked all the time. Sometimes the conception is so vague and evolutionary that it is difficult to put into words, even for a writer. However, in the case of my new novel, Bury Your Horses, there really was a single, seminal “a-ha” moment. The book’s spark came while I was working on a project for the Hockey Hall of Fame researching North American hockey.

Even before coronavirus, there was an urgent need for clear communication, for translating science into plain language, for demystifying medicine and for reducing stigma around disease and disability. This type of science writing is even more critical during this global pandemic. 

In Jacob Bronowski’s 1973 book The Ascent of Man, based on the television series, he talks about the danger of an ‘aristocracy of intellect.’ He warns that keeping scientific knowledge only amongst such an aristocracy could “destroy the civilization that we know.” He writes:

Closing Time is the seventh and final instalment in the Stonechild and Rouleau police procedural series, and the feeling is akin to sending my last child off to university. Naturally, I’m asked how it feels to finish writing about Officer Kala Stonechild, Staff Sergeant Jacques Rouleau and the rest of the gang, and I always respond, “bittersweet”.

Hello Canada, Publishing a first book takes a long time. It was over a year ago that Dundurn accepted Evie of the Deepthorn for publication, a figure that doesn’t include years of writing, revising, and submitting, and we still aren’t quite there yet. As I write this, the upcoming release seems both too soon and too far away, like getting there requires a leap of incredible faith. In some ways I feel as if I’m Achilles shooting an arrow towards a target in one of Zeno’s famous paradoxes, watching the arrow halve the distance endlessly, never quite advancing. But I know that one day—and soon—the arrow will inevitably hit its mark, the book will be released, it will find its audience, and I’ll feel that strange mixture of excitement, relief, and disappointment that comes with hitting a major milestone and inevitably wondering—when you’re allowed a minute to breathe—what comes next.

Pages